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SWF Podcast

This podcast features content produced by the Secure World Foundation (SWF), a private operating foundation that promotes cooperative solutions for space sustainability and the peaceful uses of outer space. The Foundation acts as a research body, convener and facilitator to promote key space security, and other related topics, and to examine their influence on governance and international development.
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Now displaying: 2016
Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the fourth panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Gerard Brachet, space policy consultant, former chair of COPUOS
  • Sergio Marchisio, University Sapienza of Rome
  • Mazlan Othman, Academy of Sciences Malaysia, former Director of UNOOSA
  • Scott Pace, George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute
  • Moderator: Ken Hodgkins, U.S. Department of State

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the third panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Mike Gold, U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC)
  • Elliot Pulham, Space Foundation
  • Madhurita Sengupta, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)
  • Frank Slazer, Aerospace Industries Association
  • Charity Weeden, Satellite Industry Association
  • Moderator: Marcia Smith, SpacePolicyOnline.com

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the second panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Alexander E. Ermolaev, Embassy of the Russian Federation
  • Pascal Faucher, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, France
  • Ken Hodgkins, Department of State, United States
  • Liu Jing, China National Space Administration, China
  • Andre Rypl, Agência Espacial Brasileira, Brazil
  • Atsushi Saito, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan
  • Sarah Telford, British Embassy in Washington, United Kingdom
  • Moderator: Theresa Hitchens, University of Maryland

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the introductions and first panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Simonetta di Pippo, United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA)
  • David Kendall, United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS)
  • Peter Martinez, COPUOS Long Term Sustainability Working Group
  • Moderator: Victoria Samson, Secure World Foundation

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Jun 1, 2016
Recorded in Washington, DC, on May 31, 2016
 
In 2011, the Department of Defense and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence published a National Security Space Strategy (NSSS) that provided guidance to the U.S. national security space community on how to address the challenges of what they deemed an increasingly "contested, congested, and competitive" space environment. The 2011 NSSS proposed the following set of interrelated strategic approaches for meeting U.S. national security space objectives:
  • Promote responsible, peaceful, and safe use of space;
  • Provide improved U.S. space capabilities;
  • Partner with responsible nations, international organizations, and commercial firms;
  • Prevent and deter aggression against space infrastructure that supports U.S. national security; and
  • Prepare to defeat attacks and to operate in a degraded environment
In the five years since, the debate over the U.S. approach to meeting the challenges of the future space environment has only intensified. Within the national security space community, there has been a significant amount of effort put into fleshing out the concepts to implement the 2011 NSSS, culminating in the publication in 2015 of a white paper outlining a taxonomy for Space Domain Mission Assurance and elements of the FY2016 budget request. But details are still scarce, and both the overall approach outlined in the 2011 NSSS and its implementation have attracted significant criticism and critique. Congress has signaled its concern by mandating a study on "Alternative Defense and Deterrence Strategies in Response to Foreign Counterspace Capabilities" in the FY2015 National Defense Authorization Act. Outsiders have criticized the current approach as both too weak and too aggressive.
  
This luncheon panel discussion provided a range of perspectives on both implementing the 2011 NSSS as well as alternative approaches to addressing the challenges of the current and future trends in space. 
 
More details, including speaker bios and an audio transcript, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

May 11, 2016

Space activities are becoming more globalized. Today, more than sixty countries operate one or more satellite in space, and virtually all countries depend on space for some combination of national security, social, and economic benefits. There are an increasing number of space actors as a result.  Furthermore, countries with existing space programs are also expanding their space activities into new sectors. At the same time, the world is seeing a boom in private sector activity in space, driven by the commercialization of technology and increasing availability of capital. 

As these new government and private sector actors enter into the space domain, and existing actors push into new areas, they face both challenges and opportunities. The growing use of space applications is helping address a greater number of challenges on Earth, while expanding commercial activity is leading to increased innovation and the potential development of new capabilities and lower costs. At the same time, new private sector actors face a steep learning curve for understanding regulatory requirements and safe space operations, and countries face challenges in putting in place national law and policy. 

In conjunction with its project to develop a Handbook for new Actors in Space, SWF held a luncheon panel discussion on May 10, 2016, in Washington, DC, to examine the challenges and opportunities facing new actors in space. Panelists provided a range of governmental, international, and private sector perspectives on their experiences, the obstacles they face and efforts to address these challenges. 

More information, speaker bios, and presentations can be found on the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

  • Mr. Jean-Michel Eid, Managing Director, Space Partnership International, LLC (SPI)
  • Dr. Rich Leshner, Director of Government Affairs, Planet Labs
  • Mr. Philippe Moreels, Head of Strategy and Business Development, ASTROSCALE
  • Dr. Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, Senior Fellow and Head of the Nuclear and Space Policy Initiative, Observer Research Foundation (ORF)
  • Ms. Laura Delgado López, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation (Moderator) 
May 6, 2016

As the domestic and international community discusses and implements policy and legislation focused on space resource rights, this panel will focus on identifying legal, policy, and business implications of that activity. The discussion will focus on practical considerations related to the development of space resources-related regulatory frameworks and their relationship to both commercial development and international commitments.

On May 5, 2016, SWF and the Alliance for Space Development (ASD) hosted a panel discussion in Washington, DC, on "Asteroids, Mining, and Policy: Practical Consideration of Space Resource Rights" to discuss these issues. 

For further information, speaker bios, and presentations please see the event page on the SWF website.
Speakers:

  • Kenneth Hodgkins, Director of Space and Advanced Technology, U.S. Department of State
  • Peter Marquez, Vice President for Global Engagement, Planetary Resources
  • Jim Dunstan, Founder, Mobius Legal Group
  • Christopher W. Ingraham, Senior Legislative Assistant, Office of Congressman Jim Bridenstine (R-OK)
  • Moderator:  Ian Christensen, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation
Apr 25, 2016

Space security is an increasingly important issue, and one that has taken on new meaning in recent years with increased concerns about protecting space capabilities from both intentional and environmental threats. 

On April 14, 2016, the Secure World Foundation hosted an invite-only luncheon panel discussion at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs, Colorado, as part of the 32nd Annual Space Symposium, to discuss the current state of space security using the lens of existing norms of behavior, concerns about the resiliency of space assets, and changing attitudes about space protection. 

For further information and speaker presentations, please visit the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

  • Mr. Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director General at the European Commission Directorate General for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SME’s
  • Mr. Erik Eliasen, Vice President at National Security Space Programs
  • Lt. Col. Mike Hellmann, Assistant Branch Chief of Strategic Planning and Concepts within the German MOD
  • Lt. General Eduardo Peña Merino, General de Aviación, Comandante del Comando de Combate, of the Chilean Air Force

Moderator: Dr. Michael Simpson, SWF Executive Director.

Apr 8, 2016

Our continued ability to get benefits from space assets will be interrupted if spectrum is not responsibly protected.  This issue is coming up more and more often, particularly so at meetings last November in Geneva for the World Radiocommunication Conference and as policymakers look at the future of GPS and other positioning, navigation, and timing systems.  As the U.S. government takes on the mantle of looking at how its space assets can overall be more resilient, spectrum protection is a key part of this discussion. 

This lunch-time panel will examine what major issues could potentially affect spectrum availability and utility over the near term and discuss what policies and/or legislation could help with those challenges.  

For further information and speaker bios, please see the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

  • Mr. Christopher Hegarty, Director, Communications, Navigation, Surveillance (CNS) Engineering and Spectrum, The MITRE Corporation
  • Mr. James J. Miller, Deputy Director,  Policy and Strategic Communications Division, Space Communications and Navigation Program, NASA Headquarters
  • Dr. Scott Pace, Director, Space Policy Institute, George Washington University
  • Ms. Jennifer Warren, Vice President of Technology Policy and Regulation, Washington Operations Government and Regulatory Affairs, Lockheed Martin

Moderator: Ms. Victoria Samson, SWF Washington Office Director.

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