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SWF Podcast

This podcast features content produced by the Secure World Foundation (SWF), a private operating foundation that promotes cooperative solutions for space sustainability and the peaceful uses of outer space. The Foundation acts as a research body, convener and facilitator to promote key space security, and other related topics, and to examine their influence on governance and international development.
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Jul 12, 2017

Recorded in Washington, DC, on June 27, 2017.

SWF co-sponsored, with the National Space Weather Partnership, the 2017 the Space Weather Enterprise Forum. This year’s theme was "Implementing a National Space Weather Partnership.”

The forum brought together a blended audience of space weather experts from both research and operations, space weather users from the public and private sectors, academia, international representatives, and policy makers. One of the event objectives was continuing outreach and education to raise awareness of space weather effects on systems and humans and to provide information on available services.

Speakers

  • Mr. Ralph Stoffler, Director of Weather, Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Headquarters, US Air Force
  • Major General Scott Vander Hamm, Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Headquarters, US Air Force
  • Dr. Stephen Volz, Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Observation and Prediction, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

More details, including transcripts, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

May 23, 2017

Recorded in Washington DC, on May 18, 2017.

The Embassy of Italy, the U.S. Department of State, and Secure World Foundation held a discussion on space weather as a global challenge with a focus on research, operations and preparedness. This event updated the international community on progress made toward implementing the U.S. National Space Weather Strategy and advances in Italy, Europe, and beyond.  

Featuring space-weather experts from across the world, the morning's three panels focused on space weather research and observations, space weather services, and industry perspectives. Following lunch, the participants gathered for technical discussions about improving research and observation, developing international frameworks, and enhancing preparedness. 

Speakers

  • H.E. Armando Varricchio
  • Prof. Roberto Battiston
  • Dr. Jonathan Margolis
  • Ms. Victoria Samson
  • Mr. Steven Clarke
  • Prof. Alberto Buzzoni
  • Dr. Paul Shepson
  • Dr. Mamoru Ishii
  • Dr. William Lapenta
  • Dr. Leonardo Sagnotti
  • Dr. Juergen Drescher
  • Gen. Luigi Del Bene
  • Mr. Ralph Stoffler
  • Mr. Ken Hodgkins
  • Mr. Bob Jackson
  • Mr. Frank Koza
  • Mr. Vincenzo Giorgio
  • Mr. Ignazio Droghini
  • Mr. Marco Brancati
  • Mr. Stefano Cesare

More details can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Apr 17, 2017

Recorded in Colorado Springs, CO, on April 6, 2017.

There are an increasing number of governmental and private sector actors in space, which could lead to existing new applications and benefits on Earth but also increased space sustainability challenges. To discuss these issues, SWF held an luncheon panel discussion at the 33rd Space Symposium. The panel featured a variety of perspectives to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing new actors, and the issues and potential positive benefits that the growth in participants poses to existing actors, with the goal of pointing out that structures need to be in place to ensure that all can continue to benefit from access to and use of space over the long-term. SWF presented our new Handbook for New Space Actors, an electronic version of which can be found here.

Speakers

  • Mr. Salem Humaid AlMarri, Assistant Director General for Science & Technology Sector, Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre
  • Mr. Pete Hoene, President and CEO, SES Government Solutions
  • Mr. Rich Leshner, Vice President of Government Affairs, Planet
  • Ms. Audrey Schaffer, Director, Space Strategy and Plans in the Office of the Secretary of Defense - Office of the Secretary of Defense

More details can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Jan 30, 2017

Recorded in Washington, DC, on January 27, 2017.

On January 27, 1967, the Outer Space Treaty was opened for signature in Moscow, London, and Washington DC. On the fiftieth anniversary of this occasion, a luncheon symposium was held at Georgetown University to reflect on the development of the Outer Space Treaty, the fundamental role the US government played in its development, as well as rationales behind the treaty and fundamentals of public international law underpinning the document and informing our understanding of it.

This event was organized by the American Society of International Law (ASIL) with the support of the Secure World Foundation and the Georgetown Space Law Society.

Speakers (in order of appearance):

  • Ms. Oonagh Sands, American Society of International Law
  • Mr. Christopher Johnson, Secure World Foundation
  • Moderator, Mr. Steve Mirmina, Georgetown University
  • Mr. David A. Koplow, Georgetown University
  • Mr. Robert E. Dalton, US Department of State

More details, including a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Jan 17, 2017

Recorded in Washington, DC, on January 17, 2017.

On January 11, 2007, China destroyed one of its aging weather satellites using a ground-based anti-satellite (ASAT) weapon. The 2007 ASAT test, and a similar test by the United States a year later, reignited international and domestic debates over strategic stability and deterrence, space weaponization, and the potential for a space arms race. Ten years later, many of the same tensions and questions remain. 
 
This luncheon panel discussion brought together experts to discuss the evolution of the space security environment over the last decade, and specifically the evolution and current state of the relationship between the United States and China. Panelists will provide contrasting views on the perceptions and tensions on both sides, and outline potential options and strategies the Trump Administration may take going forward.
 
Speakers (in order of appearance):

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the fourth panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Gerard Brachet, space policy consultant, former chair of COPUOS
  • Sergio Marchisio, University Sapienza of Rome
  • Mazlan Othman, Academy of Sciences Malaysia, former Director of UNOOSA
  • Scott Pace, George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute
  • Moderator: Ken Hodgkins, U.S. Department of State

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the third panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Mike Gold, U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC)
  • Elliot Pulham, Space Foundation
  • Madhurita Sengupta, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)
  • Frank Slazer, Aerospace Industries Association
  • Charity Weeden, Satellite Industry Association
  • Moderator: Marcia Smith, SpacePolicyOnline.com

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the second panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Alexander E. Ermolaev, Embassy of the Russian Federation
  • Pascal Faucher, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, France
  • Ken Hodgkins, Department of State, United States
  • Liu Jing, China National Space Administration, China
  • Andre Rypl, Agência Espacial Brasileira, Brazil
  • Atsushi Saito, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan
  • Sarah Telford, British Embassy in Washington, United Kingdom
  • Moderator: Theresa Hitchens, University of Maryland

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Nov 4, 2016

Recorded in Washington, DC, on October 21, 2016.

On June 17, 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN COPUOS) agreed to twelve long-term sustainability (LTS) guidelines, representing “best practices” for the safe and responsible use of space. These twelve voluntary guidelines mark a successful milestone out of years of discussions within COPUOS and represent the Committee’s role in fostering international cooperation in ensuring that everyone can continue to derive benefits from the use of space over the long-term.

Co-organized by the Secure World Foundation and the U.S. Department of State, "Progress and Planning Ahead: International Best Practices for Outer Space Sustainability" brought together top U.S. and international space policy experts from governments, industry, and academia to discuss the current state of the long-term sustainability guidelines discussions, national implementation strategies, and next steps for the international community to ensure that space is sustainable over the long-term.

This podcast is a recording of the introductions and first panel from the event, on "Multilateral Organizations: International Efforts and Successes."  Speakers:

  • Simonetta di Pippo, United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA)
  • David Kendall, United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS)
  • Peter Martinez, COPUOS Long Term Sustainability Working Group
  • Moderator: Victoria Samson, Secure World Foundation

More details, including speaker bios and a video recording of the event, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Jun 1, 2016
Recorded in Washington, DC, on May 31, 2016
 
In 2011, the Department of Defense and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence published a National Security Space Strategy (NSSS) that provided guidance to the U.S. national security space community on how to address the challenges of what they deemed an increasingly "contested, congested, and competitive" space environment. The 2011 NSSS proposed the following set of interrelated strategic approaches for meeting U.S. national security space objectives:
  • Promote responsible, peaceful, and safe use of space;
  • Provide improved U.S. space capabilities;
  • Partner with responsible nations, international organizations, and commercial firms;
  • Prevent and deter aggression against space infrastructure that supports U.S. national security; and
  • Prepare to defeat attacks and to operate in a degraded environment
In the five years since, the debate over the U.S. approach to meeting the challenges of the future space environment has only intensified. Within the national security space community, there has been a significant amount of effort put into fleshing out the concepts to implement the 2011 NSSS, culminating in the publication in 2015 of a white paper outlining a taxonomy for Space Domain Mission Assurance and elements of the FY2016 budget request. But details are still scarce, and both the overall approach outlined in the 2011 NSSS and its implementation have attracted significant criticism and critique. Congress has signaled its concern by mandating a study on "Alternative Defense and Deterrence Strategies in Response to Foreign Counterspace Capabilities" in the FY2015 National Defense Authorization Act. Outsiders have criticized the current approach as both too weak and too aggressive.
  
This luncheon panel discussion provided a range of perspectives on both implementing the 2011 NSSS as well as alternative approaches to addressing the challenges of the current and future trends in space. 
 
More details, including speaker bios and an audio transcript, can be found at the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

May 11, 2016

Space activities are becoming more globalized. Today, more than sixty countries operate one or more satellite in space, and virtually all countries depend on space for some combination of national security, social, and economic benefits. There are an increasing number of space actors as a result.  Furthermore, countries with existing space programs are also expanding their space activities into new sectors. At the same time, the world is seeing a boom in private sector activity in space, driven by the commercialization of technology and increasing availability of capital. 

As these new government and private sector actors enter into the space domain, and existing actors push into new areas, they face both challenges and opportunities. The growing use of space applications is helping address a greater number of challenges on Earth, while expanding commercial activity is leading to increased innovation and the potential development of new capabilities and lower costs. At the same time, new private sector actors face a steep learning curve for understanding regulatory requirements and safe space operations, and countries face challenges in putting in place national law and policy. 

In conjunction with its project to develop a Handbook for new Actors in Space, SWF held a luncheon panel discussion on May 10, 2016, in Washington, DC, to examine the challenges and opportunities facing new actors in space. Panelists provided a range of governmental, international, and private sector perspectives on their experiences, the obstacles they face and efforts to address these challenges. 

More information, speaker bios, and presentations can be found on the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

  • Mr. Jean-Michel Eid, Managing Director, Space Partnership International, LLC (SPI)
  • Dr. Rich Leshner, Director of Government Affairs, Planet Labs
  • Mr. Philippe Moreels, Head of Strategy and Business Development, ASTROSCALE
  • Dr. Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan, Senior Fellow and Head of the Nuclear and Space Policy Initiative, Observer Research Foundation (ORF)
  • Ms. Laura Delgado López, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation (Moderator) 
May 6, 2016

As the domestic and international community discusses and implements policy and legislation focused on space resource rights, this panel will focus on identifying legal, policy, and business implications of that activity. The discussion will focus on practical considerations related to the development of space resources-related regulatory frameworks and their relationship to both commercial development and international commitments.

On May 5, 2016, SWF and the Alliance for Space Development (ASD) hosted a panel discussion in Washington, DC, on "Asteroids, Mining, and Policy: Practical Consideration of Space Resource Rights" to discuss these issues. 

For further information, speaker bios, and presentations please see the event page on the SWF website.
Speakers:

  • Kenneth Hodgkins, Director of Space and Advanced Technology, U.S. Department of State
  • Peter Marquez, Vice President for Global Engagement, Planetary Resources
  • Jim Dunstan, Founder, Mobius Legal Group
  • Christopher W. Ingraham, Senior Legislative Assistant, Office of Congressman Jim Bridenstine (R-OK)
  • Moderator:  Ian Christensen, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation
Apr 25, 2016

Space security is an increasingly important issue, and one that has taken on new meaning in recent years with increased concerns about protecting space capabilities from both intentional and environmental threats. 

On April 14, 2016, the Secure World Foundation hosted an invite-only luncheon panel discussion at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs, Colorado, as part of the 32nd Annual Space Symposium, to discuss the current state of space security using the lens of existing norms of behavior, concerns about the resiliency of space assets, and changing attitudes about space protection. 

For further information and speaker presentations, please visit the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

  • Mr. Pierre Delsaux, Deputy Director General at the European Commission Directorate General for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SME’s
  • Mr. Erik Eliasen, Vice President at National Security Space Programs
  • Lt. Col. Mike Hellmann, Assistant Branch Chief of Strategic Planning and Concepts within the German MOD
  • Lt. General Eduardo Peña Merino, General de Aviación, Comandante del Comando de Combate, of the Chilean Air Force

Moderator: Dr. Michael Simpson, SWF Executive Director.

Apr 8, 2016

Our continued ability to get benefits from space assets will be interrupted if spectrum is not responsibly protected.  This issue is coming up more and more often, particularly so at meetings last November in Geneva for the World Radiocommunication Conference and as policymakers look at the future of GPS and other positioning, navigation, and timing systems.  As the U.S. government takes on the mantle of looking at how its space assets can overall be more resilient, spectrum protection is a key part of this discussion. 

This lunch-time panel will examine what major issues could potentially affect spectrum availability and utility over the near term and discuss what policies and/or legislation could help with those challenges.  

For further information and speaker bios, please see the event page on the SWF website.

Speakers

  • Mr. Christopher Hegarty, Director, Communications, Navigation, Surveillance (CNS) Engineering and Spectrum, The MITRE Corporation
  • Mr. James J. Miller, Deputy Director,  Policy and Strategic Communications Division, Space Communications and Navigation Program, NASA Headquarters
  • Dr. Scott Pace, Director, Space Policy Institute, George Washington University
  • Ms. Jennifer Warren, Vice President of Technology Policy and Regulation, Washington Operations Government and Regulatory Affairs, Lockheed Martin

Moderator: Ms. Victoria Samson, SWF Washington Office Director.

Nov 18, 2015

Recent multi-stakeholder discussions have highlighted the limited awareness on spectrum-related issues and their impacts within the broader Earth observations community, and the challenge of capturing the extent of reliance on potentially impacted programs and systems.

Sponsored by the Secure World Foundation, this morning panel event seeks to raise awareness of the risks facing the frequency bands used for meteorological purposes within the international GEO community, discuss opportunities for improved routine engagement between the relevant stakeholders, particularly at the regional level, and examine ways to communicate the impact of spectrum management decisions on the delivery of critical information services to policymakers. 

For further information and speaker bios, please see the event page on the SWF website.

Moderator: SWF Executive Director Dr. Michael Simpson

Speakers:

  • Dr. Halilu Ahmad Shaba, Director, Strategy Space Applications, National Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA)
  • Mr. David Hartshorn, Secretary General, Global VSAT Forum
  • Ms. Renee Leduc Clarke, Founder and Principal, Narayan Strategy
  • Mr. David Lubar, Radio Spectrum Management specialist in the GOES-R Program Office, Vaeros division of The Aerospace Corporation
Sep 23, 2015

Recorded September 22, 2015

Like many other sectors of space activities that were once "government only," the notion of privately owned and operated space stations is no longer science fiction. Within the next decade, it is likely we will have a scenario where there are multiple commercial and government space stations on orbit, with a mix of multiple government and private customers and a mix of government and commercial transportation services going back and forth. Such a scenario holds both incredible opportunity and a number of significant challenges to resolve.

This panel discussion brought together experts from civil society, industry, and the U.S. government to discuss what this future may look like, and what economic, policy, and regulatory challenges need to be overcome along the way. 

For further information and a copy of the presentations, please see the event page on the SWF website.

Moderator: Mr. Ian Christensen, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation

Speakers:

  • Mr. Charles Miller, President, NextGen Space, LLC
  • Mr. Mike Gold, Director, DC Operations and Business Growth, Bigelow Aerospace
  • Ms. Carissa Christensen, Managing Partner, The Tauri Group
  • Mr. Steph Earle, Office of Commercial Spaceflight, Federal Aviation Administration 
Mar 31, 2015

This event was recorded on March 27, 2015.

On Friday, March 27, 2015, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the Secure World Foundation (SWF) hosted a luncheon panel discussion from 12:00pm to 2:00pm EST on  “Challenges In Sharing Weather Satellite Spectrum With Terrestrial Networks” in Washington, DC.

In order to meet the growing demand for wireless broadband connectivity, the U.S. government is developing strategies to share radio frequency spectrum between federal and commercial users. Spectrum historically reserved for broadcasting meteorological satellite data to users from the current generation of polar-orbiting satellites was recently auctioned nationwide by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for over $2.4 billion. Federal regulators are now studying additional bands that may be shared in a future spectrum auction, including those currently used to download weather data from NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and for the future GOES-R series.

If GOES downlink spectrum is selected for sharing, there is a possibility of radio frequency interference between the new terrestrial commercial broadcasts and the existing satellite broadcasts that may render the satellite-received data unusable or degraded. Such interference could have significant impacts on the GOES-Variable (GVAR), GOES-R GOES Rebroadcast (GRB), the Emergency Managers Weather Information Network (EMWIN) -  which is used to support first responders around the country, High-Rate or Low-Rate Information Transmission (HRIT or LRIT), as well as relay of hydrometeorological data from the GOES Data Collection System (DCS), used for monitoring and warning of floods.

A panel of experts discussed these issues, including the motivation for the sharing, potential impacts to end users of any interference, and options for mitigating potential interference.

Speakers

  • Mr. Jack Brown, Director, Arlington County Office of Emergency Management
  • Dr. Carol Anne Clayson, Senior Scientist in the Department of Physical Oceanography, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)

  • Dr. Mike Johnson, Satellite Team Lead, Office of Science and Technology, National Weather Service, NOAA

  • Mr. David Lubar, Radio spectrum management specialist in the GOES-R Program Office, The Aerospace Corporation 

  • Mr. Robert Mason, Chief,  USGS Office of Surface Water, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
  • Mr. Mark Mulholland, Chief Systems Engineer, Office of Systems Development (OSD), NOAA

  • Mr. Mike Steinberg, Senior Corporate Consultant, AccuWeather

Presentations

 

Mar 24, 2015

Recorded March 23, 2015

Although some may consider the two to be at odds with each other, international law has a direct impact on military activities in both peacetime and during conflict. International law defines what constitutes an armed attack, the right to national self-defense, and the limits on use of force during an armed conflict consistent with the Geneva Conventions.

Over the last several decades, legal scholars and military practitioners have clarified the rules of international law applicable to military activities in several domains. This includes the Harvard Manual on International Law Applicable to Air and Missile Warfare, and most recently the Tallinn Manual on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Warfare. However, to date there has not been any significant attempts to clarify how international law applies to military activities in space. 

The panel discussion provided an overview of international law as it applies to military activities, and examples of how it has been clarified in certain domains, such as air and cyber, or for certain types of weapons, such as autonomous systems. It also examined the current status of international law as applied to military activities in the space domain, and potential benefits of further clarifying the existing norms and interpretations.

Speakers:

Wing Commander Duncan Blake, Royal Australian Air Force

Mr. Gary Brown, Head of Communications, Washington Delegation, International Committee of the Red Cross

Dr. Cassandra Steer, Executive Director, Centre of Research in Air and Space Law, McGill University

Dr. Peter Hays, Adjunct Professor, George Washington University

Moderator: Mr. Brian Weeden, Technical Advisor, Secure World Foundation

 

Jan 28, 2015

Recorded January 27, 2015

The Arctic region is changing rapidly, allowing for new opportunities to learn more about this remote area, use it to expand economic development, and build off it for national security and political benefits. However, there are challenges involved in ensuring that there is assured access to the Arctic, monitoring the physical changes it is undergoing, using the Arctic in a sustainable manner, and creating a stable environment for a region that could be the site of disputed land claims.  Space plays an important role in monitoring conditions in the Arctic and in enabling the management of resources there. Given that the United States will assume the chairmanship of the intergovernmental Arctic Council in April, this panel discussion examined the implications of changing Arctic conditions and how space can help improve understanding of and mitigate the disruption from those changes.

For more information, please visit the event page.

Speakers

  • Dr. Claire Parkinson, Climate Change Senior Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
  • CDR Ronald Piret, Arctic Affairs Officer, Task Force Climate Change (TFCC), U.S. Navy
  • Major Charity Weeden, Assistant Attaché Air & Space Operations, Canadian Defence Liaison Staff Washington
  • Dr. Amy Sun, Military Space Narrowband Advanced Programs Lead, Lockheed Martin
  • Mr. Michael J. Young, Arctic Affairs Officer, Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, U.S. Department of State
Jan 6, 2015

Recorded December 9, 2014

Space situational awareness (SSA) - commonly defined as knowledge about the space environment and activities in space - is an important part of space sustainability, safety, and security. SSA has historically been mostly a military mission that focused on tracking the locations of objects in space and detecting space-based threats. However, the nature of SSA is evolving as the number of actors in space increases, including an increasing proportion of non-governmental players and space activities, and the nature of the threats to active satellites diversifies and expands to include natural and human-generated threats, as well as intentional and unintentional threats. 

Secure World Foundation (SWF) held a luncheon panel discussion to discuss the changing nature of SSA and examine initiatives being developed by both the U.S. government and non-governmental entities to enhance SSA. 

For more information, please visit the event page.

Panel 1 - Established Services, Providers, and Policies

Mr. Richard Buennneke, Senior Advisor for National Security Space Policy in the Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, U.S. Department of State

Mr. John Hill, Principal Director, Space Policy, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for  Policy, U.S. Department of Defense

Mr. Andrew D'Uva,  President, Providence Access Company

Panel 2 - Emerging Services, Providers, and Policies

Dr. Michael Romanowski, Director, Commercial Space Integration, Federal Aviation Administration

Mr. Paul Welsh, Vice President of Business Development, Analytical Graphics, Inc. (AGI)

Mr. Matthew Bold, Chief Architect, Ground Based Space Situational Awareness (GBSSA), Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center

The discussion was be moderated  by Mr. Brian Weeden, SWF Technical Advisor.

 

Jan 6, 2015

Recorded June 16, 2014

Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) is the effective understanding of anything associated with the maritime domain that could impact security, safety, economy, or environment. Space capabilities are an important element of MDA, including space-based radar imaging and surveillance, ocean temperature and sea ice monitoring, among others. A number of countries are developing space capabilities to support MDA, but there are still significant gaps in coordination and cooperation between these efforts, as well as integrating space-based information with other sources into a holistic MDA picture and getting it to those who need it on the ground in a usable manner. This panel session provided an overview of the importance of MDA and the various efforts to provide space-based capabilities to improve MDA. The session also offered a discussion on opportunities for enhancing international cooperation, both in space and on the ground, to improve MDA for all nations.

For more information, including speaker presentations, please see the event page.

Speakers:

Dr. Bharath Gopalaswamy, Deputy Director, South Asia Center, Atlantic Council 

Mr. Jon Huggins, Director of Ocean's Beyond Piracy, One Earth Future Foundation 

Dr. John Mittleman, Engineer, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory 

Prof. Guy Thomas, Co-Founder, C-SIGMA Centre 

Major Charity Weeden, Assistant Attaché Air and Space Operations, Royal Canadian Air Force 

 

Jan 6, 2015

Recorded December 9, 2013

Inspired by the recent box office hit and cinematic masterpiece, Gravity, Secure World Foundation (SWF) held a panel discussion and luncheon that discussed the various legal, policy, political, and strategic implications of the scenario depicted in director Alfonso Cuarón's celebrated film Gravity and if such an accident in space were to occur in real life. Could such an accident really happen today? What is the real life threat of space debris as compared to that portrayed in the film? Legal issues to be discussed will include what the current international legal regime brings to this scenario and the difficulty of defining space debris, as highlighted by the recently published Guide to Space Law Terms published by SWF and the George Washington University's Space Policy Institute. What would be the political and strategic consequences in the international community? A brief history on anti-satellite (ASAT) programs, as well as the Chinese space station Tiangong, both of which featured prominently in the film, will be covered during the event as well. Finally, what is being done to address such a threat today, especially at the international level?

For more information, including speaker presentations, please visit the event page.

Speakers:

Dr. Henry Hertzfeld, Research Professor of Space Policy and International Affairs, George Washington University, Space Policy Institute

Dr. Darren McKnight, Technical Director, Integrity Applications, Inc.

Mr. Kirk Shireman, Deputy Director, Johnson Space Center, NASA

Ms. Marcia Smith, Founder and Editor, SpacePolicyOnline.com

The discussion will be moderated by Ms. Victoria Samson, Washington Office Director, Secure World Foundation.

 

Jan 6, 2015

Recorded November 4, 2013

On-orbit satellite servicing (OOS) and active debris removal (ADR) are part of an emerging category of future on-orbit activities that are critical for taking the next leap in our use of Earth orbit. The ability to repair or refuel satellites, construct new satellites in orbit, and even remove orbital debris can help drive innovative uses of space and create new possibilities. These activities also raise a host of security, legal, safety, operational, and policy challenges that need to be tackled for this future to be possible.

In 2012, DARPA held a public conference and workshop in Washington, DC, and in 2012 and 2013, SWF worked with partners to hold a series of conferences, workshops, and panel discussions to explore these various multidisciplinary challenges. The events took place in the United States, Belgium, and Singapore and included representation from a variety of international stakeholders. This panel discussion summarizes those events as well as provides "insider and outsider" perspectives on the non-technical challenges that need to be addressed for ADR and OOS to become reality.

Speakers:

Mr. David Barnhart, Project Manager, Tactical Technology Office, DARPA

Mr. Brian Weeden, Technical Advisor, Secure World Foundation 

The discussion was moderated by Dr. Michael Simpson, Executive Director, Secure World Foundation.

Jan 6, 2015

Recorded July 24, 2013

Secure World Foundation (SWF) and the Tauri Group co-hosted an international space reception to bring together the international space policy makers and international space stakeholders within the Beltway. Speakers discussed the U.S. government's priorities for and interests in international space cooperation and outreach; a survey of international space professionals about prioritizing various aspects of space sustainability; and regional space dynamics, looking at national budgets, satellite capabilities, spaceflight, and science missions by region. 

For more information, including speaker presentations, please visit the event page.

Speakers

Mr. Frank Rose, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, U.S. Department of State

Ms. Carissa Christensen, Founder and Managing Partner, The Tauri Group

Mr. Brian Weeden, Technical Advisor, Secure World Foundation

Moderator: Ms. Victoria Samson, Washington Office Director, Secure World Foundation

Jan 6, 2015

Recorded July 15, 2013

Secure World Foundation and the Commons Lab of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars co-hosted a panel discussion to examine issues in sharing Earth observation satellite data, including general challenges for data sharing, problems with coordinating data, questions about how the U.S. government makes data policy sharing decisions and how they relate to the larger international context, and overall assessments about the importance of data-sharing and international cooperation.  This panel is intended to focus on unclassified data-sharing in a civil context.

For more information, including speaker presentations, visit the event page.

Speakers

Dr. Mariel John Borowitz, Research Analyst, Space Foundation

Dr. Molly Macauley, Vice President of Research and Senior Fellow, Resources for the Future

Dr. Martha Maiden, Program Executive, NASA Earth Science Data Systems

Mr. Timothy Stryker, Chief of Policy, Plans and Analysis, Land Remote Sensing Program, U.S. Geological Survey

Moderator: Ms. Tiffany Chow, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation

 

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