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SWF Podcast

This podcast features content produced by the Secure World Foundation (SWF), a private operating foundation that promotes cooperative solutions for space sustainability and the peaceful uses of outer space. The Foundation acts as a research body, convener and facilitator to promote key space security, and other related topics, and to examine their influence on governance and international development.
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Sep 23, 2015

Recorded September 22, 2015

Like many other sectors of space activities that were once "government only," the notion of privately owned and operated space stations is no longer science fiction. Within the next decade, it is likely we will have a scenario where there are multiple commercial and government space stations on orbit, with a mix of multiple government and private customers and a mix of government and commercial transportation services going back and forth. Such a scenario holds both incredible opportunity and a number of significant challenges to resolve.

This panel discussion brought together experts from civil society, industry, and the U.S. government to discuss what this future may look like, and what economic, policy, and regulatory challenges need to be overcome along the way. 

For further information and a copy of the presentations, please see the event page on the SWF website.

Moderator: Mr. Ian Christensen, Project Manager, Secure World Foundation

Speakers:

  • Mr. Charles Miller, President, NextGen Space, LLC
  • Mr. Mike Gold, Director, DC Operations and Business Growth, Bigelow Aerospace
  • Ms. Carissa Christensen, Managing Partner, The Tauri Group
  • Mr. Steph Earle, Office of Commercial Spaceflight, Federal Aviation Administration 
1 Comments
  • four and a half years ago
    Tony Marshallsay
    I was pleased to hear Charles Miller talking about sending tanks of fuel to LEO for a filling station for satellites and rockets, and technical modules in bubble wrap for in-orbit testing and subsequent assembly into those vehicles, as this coincides with my own views.
    We differ, however, in that he assumes that all such work will be performed in the LEO microgravity environment, while I believe that although the macro-assembly of completed vehicle modules to a common frame or control & propulsion unit must necessarily be done there, fit-out and testing of those macro modules would best be done in a synthetic gravity environment, in which normal tools and testing equipment could be used. Consequently I was disappointed that there was no mention whatever in the discussion of synthgrav space stations, even as something which might be considered in future, since I believe at least one such station will be necessary to maintain the health of the technicians who will be based in LEO long-term.
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